Recap of My Week – Struggles of Walking and Running Free

This was the week of lessons.

I learned that walking can come about easily enough under certain circumstances. I also learned that walking can be a pain in the ass when you’re swamped and work what is essentially a desk job.

I also learned that maybe I should run as fast as I want like maybe I knew I should all along.

But before we run we have to walk. More specifically, we have to walk 10,000 steps ever day.

Or try.

I’ve had two blips. The first was last Saturday after running on Friday and yogaing (sure that’s a word) on Saturday and then not wanting to move the rest of the day. Weather was also a contributor, so that was my first missed day.

And then yesterday, I was just blowing and going all day. Unfortunately, all the going was mentally, not physically. I was at 5,000 as work was ending, and I decided it wasn’t really worth it to put in close to an hour of walking so late in the day.

Despite the blips, I’m still averaging 10k steps a day, so at least I know I’m doing ok even if I don’t always hit my goal. 2 misses out of 15 isn’t that bad.

Work is the wild card. When I have a good day at work in terms of managing my time, 10K steps is downright easy. Wednesday, I was about 1,800 shy before I went for my post-work run, and then vaulted past my goal. When I have a bad day, there’s not much I can do. I depend on a morning walk to the office, mid-morning mental refresher, walk to wherever my lunch is, mid-afternoon mental refresher, and the walk from the office. Generally, that gets me close. Yesterday, I got I didn’t get the refreshers, and I wasn’t even close as work was ending.

So while weekends are harder to hit 10K, they’re harder to lose on overall because I don’t have time constraints. No one shows Saturday morning cartoons any more, so I don’t really have anything better to do.

We learned about walking, so let’s learn about running too.

During the past year, I tried to slow down in an effort to be able to run longer.

It was a complete failure.

I kept running the same distance over the same time no matter how I ran. And I was honestly starting to wonder if I was hurting myself by slowing down. My first foot injury came from two slow runs back to back. After trying to run slower in August, I had an issue flare up.

It just felt like I was running more efficiently when going faster. It felt smoother. Like a gazelle. Like a 190-pound (now 185), bearded gazelle. I always assumed it was a product of only doing short distances as a kid.

In the back of my head, it just seemed better. I mostly wanted to increase my ability to run distances so I could resume running faster.

And then I found this:  http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/running-faster-could-prevent-knee-strain?cid=soc_runnersworld_TWITTER_Runner%E2%80%99s%20World__Injuries

The summary is that heel strikers (which I most definitely am), put more stress on their knees when they run slower because they have to take more steps to cover the same distance, causing runner’s knee (which I deal with, if I was properly diagnosed). Faster runners put more strain on hamstrings and achilles (neither of which have been problem children of mine).

And that was all I needed. I’m tired of running a way I don’t like so that maybe I can run farther without stopping. I can’t. I tried. And I got hurt along the way. So I’m going back to running the way I like to run. When that doesn’t work, then I’ll try something new, but I’m not running slow just to cave to peer pressure (sure, we’ll pretend it was peer pressure).

-Q

#ihaterunning

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s